The Voice of God

Concerto for Flute and Harp K299 (Andantino)

Serenade no 10 for Wind Instruments K.361 ‘Gran Partita’ (Adagio)

Romance from Piano Concerto no 20 K.466

Romance from Piano Concerto no 21 K.467

Adagio from Piano Concerto no 23 K.488

Piano Concerto no 15 K.450 (3 – Allegro)

Piano Concerto no 22 K. 482 (3 – Allegro)

Piano Concerto no 20 K.466, on period instruments (1/4)

Piano Concerto no 20 K.466, on period instruments (2/4)

Piano Concerto no 20 K.466, on period instruments (3/4)

Piano Concerto no 20 K.466, on period instruments (4/4)

Piano Concerto no 21 K.467, on period instruments (1/3)

Piano Concerto no 21 K.467, on period instruments (2/3)

Piano Concerto no 21 K.467, on period instruments (3/3)

Piano Concerto no 23 K.488, on period instruments (1)

Piano Concerto no 23 K.488, on period instruments (2)

Piano Concerto no 23 K.488, on period instruments (3)

Piano Concerto no 22 K.482 (1/5 – Allegro)

Piano Concerto no 22 K.482 (2/5 – Allegro)

Piano Concerto no 22 K.482 (3/5 – Andante)

Piano Concerto no 22 K.482 (4/5 – Allegro)

Piano Concerto no 22 K.482 (5/5 – Allegro)

Symphony no 25 K.183 (Allegro)

Symphony no 25 K.183 (1/4)

Symphony no 25 K.183 (2/4)

Symphony no 25 K.183 (3&4/4)

Symphony no 40 K.550 (Allegro 1)

Symphony no 40 K.550 (Allegro 1)

Symphony no 40 K.550 (1 – Allegro)

Symphony no 40 K.550 (2 – Andante)

Symphony no 40 K.550 (3 – Menuet & Trio)

Symphony no 40 K.550 (4 – Finale Allegro)

It is said that in Italy, on April 11th 1770, Mozart and his father were attending the performance of the famous Miserere by Allegri, in the Sistine Chapel. The work had been jealously guarded by the master of the Chapel, who wanted to keep it exclusive (nobody had a score or copy of the work, and it was forbidden to even try to get one). After this first  hearing, Wolfgang went back home where they stayed, and wrote down the nine voices of the Miserere on score – which has since made the tour of the world. The entire work was already engraved in his memory after one hearing only!

The miracle with Mozart is the way in which he composes. He first hears the music, in its entirety, in his mind, with the line of each instrument clearly outlined, and only after this he will write it on paper. Mozart composes frenetically, as fast as his pen slides on the paper, he never comes back on the scores and rarely makes corrections – a detail from the movie Amadeus shows Salieri’s astonishment as he looks over Mozart’s original scores, with no touch ups and a perfection of melody which inspires the thought that Mozart is the proof that God exists

Leave a comment

No comments yet.

Comments RSS TrackBack Identifier URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s